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THE

Defender Picks

 

MARDI

March 28th

Book Reading: Elizabeth Pearce

Garden District Book Shop, 6PM

From her new book "Drink Dat New Orleans: A Guide to the Best Cocktail Bars, Dives, & Speakeasies"

 

Spring Publishing Camp

Tubby & Coo's Mid-City Book Shop, 7PM

Book publishing workshop

 

Gabby Douglas

Dillrd University, 7PM

Olympic gymnast talks fame and fitness

 

Laelume

The Carver, 7PM

World soul jazz music

 

Laughter Without Borders

Loyola University, 7PM

Clowns for a cause, to benefit Syrian refugees

 

Tuesday Night Haircuts

St. Roch Tavern, 8PM

Tonight: beer, haircuts, karaoke

 

Thinkin' With Lincoln 

Bayou Beer Garden, 8PM

Outdoor trivia

 

Water Seed

Blue Nile, 9PM

Interstellar future funk

 

Stanton Moore Trio

Snug Harbor, 10PM

Galactic drummer’s side project - also at 8PM

MERCREDI

March 29th

Response: Artists in the Park

Botanical Garden, 10AM

Art exhibit and sale en plein air

 

Studio Opening Party

Alex Beard Studio, 5PM

Drinks, food, painting to celebrate the artist's studio opening

 

Sippin' in the Courtyard

Maison Dupuy Hotel, 5PM

Fancy foods, music by jazz great Tim Laughlin, and event raffle

 

Work Hard, Play Hard

Benachi House & Gardens, 6PM

Southern Rep's fundraising dinner and party 

 

Lecture: Patrick Smith

New Canal Lighthouse, 6PM

Coastal scientist discusses his work

 

Pelicans vs. Dallas Mavericks

Smoothie King Center, 7PM

The Birds and the Mavs go head to head

 

Drag Bingo

Allways Lounge, 7PM

Last game planned in the Allways's popular performance & game night

 

They Blinded Me With Science: A Bartender Science Fair

2314 Iberville St., 7:30PM

Cocktails for a cause

 

Brian Wilson 

Saenger Theatre, 8PM

The Beach Boy presents "Pet Sounds" 

 

Movie Screening: Napoleon Dynamite

Catahoula Hotel, 8PM

Free drinks if you can do his dance. Vote for Pedro!

 

Blood Jet Poetry Series

BJs in the Bywater, 8PM

Poetry with Clare Welsh and Todd Cirillo

 

Horror Shorts

Bar Redux, 9PM

NOLA's Horror Films Fest screens shorts

 

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie

Howlin Wolf, 10PM

Bronx hip hop comes south

 

JEUDI

March 30th

Aerials in the Atrium

Bywater Art Lofts, 6PM

Live art in the air

 

Ogden After Hours

Ogden Museum, 6PM

Feat. Mia Borders

 

Pete Fountain: A Life Half-Fast

New Orleans Jazz Museum, 6PM

Exhibit opening on the late Pete Fountain

 

Big Freedia Opening Night Mixer

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, 6PM

Unveiling of Big Freedia's 2018 Krew du Viewux costume

 

An Edible Evening

Langston Hughes Academy, 7PM

8th annual dinner party in the Dreamkeeper Garden

 

RAW Artists Present: CUSP

The Republlic, 7PM

Immersive pop-up gallery, boutique, and stage show

 

Electric Swandive, Hey Thanks, Something More, Chris Schwartz

Euphorbia Kava Bar, 7PM

DIY rock, pop, punk show

 

The Avett Brothers

Saenger Theatre, 7:30PM

Americana folk-rock

 

Stand-Up NOLA

Joy Theater, 8PM

Comedy cabaret

 

Stooges Brass Band

The Carver, 9PM

NOLA brass all-stars

 

Wolves and Wolves and Wolves and Wolves

Gasa Gasa, 9PM

Feat. Burn Like Fire and I'm Fine in support

 

Fluffing the Ego

Allways Lounge, 10:30PM

Feat. Creep Cuts and Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers

 

Fast Times Dance Party

One Eyed Jacks, 10:30PM

80s dance party

 

A Cut Above: Seersucker Day


by Liz Davas

Happy National Seersucker Day, y’all! Today, we celebrate one of New Orleans’ greatest gifts to the fashion world, the seersucker suit. While we did not invent it, we damn well perfected it—we pretty much had to. New Orleans sits in a subtropical climate, and a dark-colored suit just doesn’t work in the 90-degrees-with-90-percent-humidity lifestyle. Without the seersucker suit, the CBD would have been scattered with businessmen knocked out from heat, instead of long, cocktail-fueled lunch meetings.


Pipe Dreams: La. Colonial Trade Explored in French Quarter


In the early years of our great city, tobacco cultivation was the order of the day. The French Company of the Indies had this hardcore belief that the humid bayou was the place to upstage Britain's tobacco concern in Virginia, thus eliminating the need for France to import the plant from its colonial rival. Scheming Scotsman John Law (no relation) engineered the plan, which failed horribly, but ended up increasing the Company's influence in the young colony. A new exhibition at the Historic New Orleans Collection, "Pipe Dreams," explains this story in rich detail. 


A Company Man

Newly Edited Memoir of 18th Century Clerk Offers Rare Peek Into Historic New Orleans



In 1730, Marc-Antoine Caillot arrived in New Orleans to record his observations about Louisiana, or 'New France,' as he knew it. In 'A Company Man,' modern Crescent City residents get a peek into their hometown in the 18th Century and see that much of the lure of 18th Century New Orleans persists into the 21st.


Cabildo Fire Revisited


On May 11, 1988, plumes of black smoke draped the French Quarter as the Cabildo - one of those historic buildings that flank St. Louis Cathedral - burst into flames. The blaze destroyed the cupola and the entire third floor, both of which would not be reopened to the public until 1994. The dramatic scene brought crowds to the Quarter, who were eventually banished behind the fence once the blaze was under control. It was, in fact, the second time the Cabildo caught fire. The original structure was destroyed in the Great New Orleans fire of 200 years earlier - 1788. To look back the Louisiana State Museum has some pictures here. 


Steamboat Saturday in Jackson Square


The year eighteen hundred twelve was not only the year of its namesake war, nor was it merely the year that Louisiane gained her place among these United States. In 1812, the first steamboat completed traveling the length of the Mighty Mississippi to make port in New Orleans. The journey, undertaken by the steamboat's architect and Teddy Roosevelt's great uncle Nicholas Roosevelt, took more than four months to completes.


Balls & Brawls


Ah yes, the life of a senior editor. Over at The Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates was, for whatever reason, looking into the history of our city''s masked balls today. Yet, in his perusing, Coates stumbles upon  a  description of a time when balls dominated the social scene, and the origin of bloodlines was reason to fight. He quotes from old articles about the balls that describe walking sticks getting raised at fiddlers, blows and pocket-pistols out in the open and a brawl that resulted in people being "more or less dangerously wounded." Perhaps things haven't changed that much, as the mayhem is described as going down "without any interruption from police."


Carrying the Torch

Flambeau Barers Shed Light on Early Mardi Gras Traditions



Between the colorful floats and raucous marching bands, a humbler – yet no less staid – Mardi Gras tradition slips between the cracks in the marching order. Keepers of the light are known to lead the way for those lost in the dark and that is a perfect way to describe a flambeau carrier.


The Crescent's Cattle Call


Before Brad Pitt and Drew Brees, the only Grade A meat we had passing through these parts was running in herds. Often known as a port town, New Orleans was also a destination for cowboys driving cattle toward the meatpacking mecca of Chicago. As Murphy Givens relates in today's Corpus Christi Caller, the journey over the Cajun Country swamps was treacherous for famed driver Shanghai Pierce, among others.


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Contributors:

Evan Z.E. Hammond, Dead Huey, Andrew Smith

Listings Editor


Photographers


Art Director:

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor:

Alexis Manrodt

Published Daily

Editor Emeritus:

B. E. Mintz

Editor Emeritus



Stephen Babcock