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Freedom Fighter

120 Years After SCOTUS Plessy v. Ferguson Decision



120 years ago today (5.18), the Supreme Court of the United States handed down a seven-to-one decision in Plessy versus Ferguson effectively beginning the Jim Crow era. While much has changed in the time since, there is still much work to be done and the descendants of the New Orleans men at the center of the case are leading the charge.


Parade Planner: Zulu Anniversary Parade


It’s never too early to start thinking about Mardi Gras. In fact, Zulu is already looking towards fat Tuesday. The storied krewe’s 107th Anniversary Parade rolls through the Treme and Seventh Ward today as candidates compete for coveted spots on the big day.


Hops Hoopla

Courtyard Brewery Celebrates One Year



An old maxim prescribes that the first year of business os the hardest. For Courtyard Brewery (1020 Erato Street) co-founder Scott Wood, this is certainly true. However, the first year has also been somewhat sweet for the nano-brewery. So, on Saturday (10.24), Wood and his partner Lindsay Hellwig are throwing a party to mark Courtyard’s one year anniversary.


"Don't Call Me Resilient"


For two weeks, New Orleans has been inundated with coverage of the Katrina/Federal Flood. And more than a few locals are sick of it. In particular, the City’s official slogan “resilient” is drawing fire. After a week of social media backlash, viral signs are now popping up to critique the catchphrase.


K10: POTUS Edition

Obama Marks Katrina Anniversary (Video)



Wednesday (8.27) was a beautiful New Orleans day, perfect for a presidential visit. President Barack Obama spoke at the recently opened Andrew P. Sanchez Community Center (1616 Caffin Avenue) in the Lower 9th Ward. The POTUS touched on government failure, income inequality, and lots about the Recovery.


K10: The Big List

Event Listings for Storm & Flood Commemorations



Many New Orleanians are already tired of the ceremonies, op-eds, and panels marking the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the levee breach, and the subsequent Federal Flood. However, for those looking for more events to attend, NoDef compiled a list of them all. (Well, almost all. There are lots and we certainly missed some. So, leave us any additions in the comments section and our writers will update the list.) Click on through for details.


POTUS Time


After Katrina hit New Orleans and the levees broke, the absence of then President George W. Bush provided a conspicuous exclamation point to the federal government’s lack of action. The current POTUS will not be making the same mistake during the ten year anniversary commemorations. Obama will be visiting NOLA on August 27th according to the White House.


Event to Mark Three Years Since Sinkhole Devastated Bayou Corne


By Lucy Leonard

On August 3, 2012, the lives of the people living on Bayou Corne changed forever. Deep beneath the feet of the city’s citizens, an underground salt dome cavern, owned by Texas Brine Company, collapsed. The event caused the creation of a dangerous sinkhole, which released oil and gases and sucked sediment, trees and more downward. As the now nearly empty community approaches the three-year anniversary of the disaster, documentary filmmaker and New Orleans resident Victoria Greene is hoping to bring the community back together for closure.


Mailbag: "Stories That Do Not Belong to You," A Response to Beller's NY'er Piece


Tulane prof Dr. Thomas Beller recently published "Don't Call It Katrina," an essay about the Federal Flood and Katrina in The New Yorker magazine. the essay was received with critical kudos and social media buzz. However, reader Robin McDowell was not impressed. Below she offers a rebuttal arguing that Beller's article continues a dangerous practice of subjugating minorities.


The Cradle Will Rock

Part II: The Show Must Go On



In 1937, the Great Depression raged and unions began to rise. Amdist an atmosphere of anxiety and unrest, The Cradle Will Rock was rehearsed. Part I of this series expains that background. In this installment, we pick up after the Memorial Day Massacre.

When a telegram from Washington came on June 11, the company assumed their fears had come true. Bureaucrats ordered that the show - and all other openings for Federal Theatre Project performances - be postponed until the new fiscal year. The WPA hired guards to lock the doors of the Maxine Elliott Theatre on 39th street. Costume, props, and Orson Welles’ scenery were also guarded. Cradle’s opening had been set for June 16, and the company was livid.


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Contributors

Renard Boissiere, Evan Z.E. Hammond, Naimonu James, Wilson Koewing, J.A. Lloyd, Nina Luckman, Dead Huey Long, Alexis Manrodt, Joseph Santiago, Andrew Smith, Cynthia Via, Austin Yde

Photographers


Art Director

Michael Weber, B.A.

Editor


Listings Editor

Linzi Falk

Editor Emeritus

Alexis Manrodt


B. E. Mintz


Stephen Babcock

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